What’s New in Azure Networking – December Edition

Azure Networking is the foundation of your infrastructure in Azure. So @pierre and I decided we'd bring you a monthly update on What's new in Azure Networking. In this blog post, you're introduced to the topics from our show, Wired for Hybrid, with helpful links for you to dive deeper into each of the topic areas.

This month, we cover a few items to round out the year, and some things for you to look forward in 2023.

Generally available: Custom IP Prefixes (BYOIP) now available in US Government regions

With this release, you can now use Custom IP Prefixes (aka Bring your own IP – BYOIP) in the US Government regions. BYOIP allows organizations to use their own IP ranges in Azure. For organizations in or moving to a hybrid model, this is the next step to bridging your on-premises resources and Azure resources into a single by retaining your existing IP ranges.

References

Manage a custom IP address prefix
Create a custom IPv4 address prefix – Azure portal

Generally available: Custom IP Prefixes (BYOIP) now available in US Government regions | Azure updat…

General availability: Static IP configurations of private endpoints

In the first of two new features for private endpoint, you can now use static IP addresses when configuring private endpoints in your environment. Traditionally, these are dynamically allocated out of a subnet's IP range. While this might work in most environments, certain secure implementations requiring a static IP address would be impacted by this. For those organizations needing static assignments, you can now implement this in Azure. The one caveat is you have to assign at creation of the private endpoint, which can be done through the portal, powershell, or az cli. This may mean a recreation of some endpoints to use this feature.

References

Learn to create a private endpoint by using Azure PowerShell

Learn to create a private endpoint by using Azure PowerShell

Learn to create a private endpoint by using Azure CLI

General availability: Static IP configurations of private endpoints | Azure updates | Microsoft Azur…

General availability: Custom network interface name configurations of private endpoints

In the second of two new features with private link, you can customize the interface names of your private endpoints. Before this, you were limited to using the built-in naming convention which included the endpoint's name and it's GUID. In a large (or any) organization, this created challenges identifying an endpoint by name. Now you can utilize a custom naming convention that aligns with standards you use with other Azure resources. The only caveat is you can't rename an existing interface. Customization occurs at creation of the private endpoint.

References

Learn to rename Azure Private Endpoints – Azure Private Link

General availability: Custom network interface name configurations of private endpoints | Azure upda…

General availability: Azure DNS Private Resolver – hybrid name resolution and conditional forwarding

The last feature is a good one. Azure DNS Private Resolver continues the work to make your on-premises infrastructure and Azure infrastructure one . It does this by providing an Azure-based solution to resolve and conditionally forward DNS queries from a virtual network, on-premises, and to other target servers without the need to create and manage a custom DNS solution. No custom DNS solutions or hacks are needed.

References

Create an Azure DNS Private Resolver using the Azure porta

Create an Azure DNS Private Resolver using Azure PowerShell
Create a private endpoint DNS infrastructure with Azure Private Resolver for an on-premises workload…

General availability: Azure DNS Private Resolver – hybrid name resolution and conditional forwarding…

New Features in Public Preview

For some things to look out for in the future, here are a few features that are now in Public Preview.

Important Note on Public Preview features – These features are provided without a service level agreement, and are not recommended for production workloads. Use them in a test environment and definitely expect things to change without notice.

In the coming months, we'll be covering new features in Azure Networking as well as taking deep dives into use different networking features. You can expect a “What's New” video around the 15th of each month. We'd love to hear your feedback on topics you found helpful, and suggestions for our future talks.

See you in 2023!

 

This article was originally published by Microsoft's Core Infrastructure and Security Blog. You can find the original article here.